LetsExtract Email Studio 4.3 Lite

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[ MikeR ],

Yes, there is often variance between what’s promised, what we expect, and what’s really inside each day’s offering.

Regardless, it’s all free, and some of it turns out to be a mismatch for our interests, and a waste of time, and some of it seems okay if not stellar.

Today’s offering of LetsExtract Email Studio v4 makes random email lists, it does not build a useful address book, and their free web-based equivalent shows the results — just a bunch of unreferenced emails … and their phone extractor failed to work in my test.

They have self-identified competition: Email Extractor Pro, Email Grabber, Lead Extractor, Email Miner, Email Scraper … so now we can more easily comparison shop, though we can do a simple Google search for “extract contact information from the web” or simply “data scraper”.

That said, what’s the value in this software for those of us NOT building a broadcast email list for spam or to sell fresh lists to spammers?

I tested by entering one of my favorite hobby sites, and it immediately built a site map for me, so now I not only know what’s on the site, I also know from the web page titles exactly what web page will bring me to particular subjects that I did not previously know were offered, web pages about subjects that interest and fascinate me, but were buried and obfuscated by an inelegant web designer … for example, I had no idea the web site had a forum, now I know how to connect with other readers.

I like that this software offers results in process, it produced 2 emails almost immediately while it continues to hunt through thousands of other web pages for my test site, so I could get started contacting these people without waiting for completion — luckily some email addresses show someone’s name in them, however, this software does not scrape nearby information to identify an email holders name otherwise, so, for example, [ j2043 @ email . com ] will leave you wondering who that is, but [ jsmith @ email . com ] at least is semi-self-explanatory.

This shows you the web page it came from so you can review the source for context just in case someone does put their name neat their cryptic email address.

I can imagine this is also a useful tool for when I have a challenging transaction with someone and I want to contact the owner, their boss, or whomever is responsible, I can explore their public presence for ways to contact them, then either use it, or turn it over to my lawyer, a court, the FBI, and so on.

there are many features only available in the upgraded “Pro” version, such as email verification, this is the “Lite Personal Version”.

It can search my hard drive, deady slow, but scraped from programs and photos, not just text documents, so that may be informative.

It’s a tool, now to play with creative ways to implement it’s features and reap some benefits …
.
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.
[ MikeR ],

Yes, there is often variance between what’s promised, what we expect, and what’s really inside each day’s offering.

Regardless, it’s all free, and some of it turns out to be a mismatch for our interests, and a waste of time, and some of it seems okay if not stellar.

Today’s offering of LetsExtract Email Studio v4 makes random email lists, it does not build a useful address book, and their free web-based equivalent shows the results — just a bunch of unreferenced emails … and their phone extractor failed to work in my test.

They have self-identified competition: Email Extractor Pro, Email Grabber, Lead Extractor, Email Miner, Email Scraper … so now we can more easily comparison shop, though we can do a simple Google search for “extract contact information from the web” or simply “data scraper”.

That said, what’s the value in this software for those of us NOT building a broadcast email list for spam or to sell fresh lists to spammers?

I tested by entering one of my favorite hobby sites, and it immediately built a site map for me, so now I not only know what’s on the site, I also know from the web page titles exactly what web page will bring me to particular subjects that I did not previously know were offered, web pages about subjects that interest and fascinate me, but were buried and obfuscated by an inelegant web designer … for example, I had no idea the web site had a forum, now I know how to connect with other readers.

I like that this software offers results in process, it produced 2 emails almost immediately while it continues to hunt through thousands of other web pages for my test site, so I could get started contacting these people without waiting for completion — luckily some email addresses show someone’s name in them, however, this software does not scrape nearby information to identify an email holders name otherwise, so, for example, [ j2043 @ email . com ] will leave you wondering who that is, but [ jsmith @ email . com ] at least is semi-self-explanatory.

This shows you the web page it came from so you can review the source for context just in case someone does put their name neat their cryptic email address.

I can imagine this is also a useful tool for when I have a challenging transaction with someone and I want to contact the owner, their boss, or whomever is responsible, I can explore their public presence for ways to contact them, then either use it, or turn it over to my lawyer, a court, the FBI, and so on.

there are many features only available in the upgraded “Pro” version, such as email verification, this is the “Lite Personal Version”.

It can search my hard drive, deady slow, but scraped from programs and photos, not just text documents, so that may be informative.

It’s a tool, now to play with creative ways to implement it’s features and reap some benefits …
.
.
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